Tag Archives: Dalai Lama

An Indictment But Also A Promise

A Pleiadian message:  “Most of the human race is so utterly indoctrinated by the externally implanted ‘norms’ that bombard their minds from the cradle to the grave that they have no comprehension that their “normal” thinking is their own individual and collective prison…”

This article is an analysis of the proliferating systems in our realm of existence which lack the all-encompassing (universal) outlook which should have taken into account not only the physical, but also, the mental and spiritual well-being of all sentient beings.  Whether they be in the economic, political, religious, and to some extent the scientific spheres, with the last having limited itself to studying only observable phenomena, all these have fallen short of every rational human aspiration.  And unless these present-day problems are addressed, we open ourselves to further frustrations and even more complicated social predicaments.

A universal outlook needs to be adapted to address the issue of tribalism, nationalism, capitalism, communism and any and all other forms of divisive isms that have plagued this planet since.  The inaction being engendered by the above conditions will further condemn us to stagnation and further degeneration.

For, it is not so much what fate, destiny or karma has dealt you with that counts, it is your attitude and more importantly, your actions in the face of these conditions that really matter.

To cite an example: a Buddhist monk’s father who was born in England during the pre-war  days and had a father who was an alcoholic and an abusive one to boot, had to endure beatings from the latter for no other reason than that he was in his line of vision upon coming home.  Anybody else, and that includes his own mother, in view was subjected to the same treatment.  During one of these occasions, after enduring the pain of such beatings, this monk’s father vowed that if one day he had children of his own, he would never inflict or visit this same treatment upon them.  And so, as a child, this future monk never saw his father raise his hand against him nor his brother.   In fact, it was the mother who stood as the disciplinarian.

Another example that comes to mind would be Stephen Hawkings.  Instead of riling against the injustices that fate has dealt him with, he overcame his physical disabilities by becoming a respected scientific thinker.

The prevailing mode of education in place is found wanting in dealing with the most important aspect of the sentient being, our mind.  Mind is presently reduced to a series of brain cells and neuron pathways, all physical, but education never touches on the very essential mechanism and operation of this most important subject called mind.   Science presently is in denial.  We know it is not the brain but we still cling to the conventional belief that it is, even though it is a fact that a dead body still has one but no longer possesses any mental attributes.

As we keep holding on to this conventional thinking of “brain over mind”, we might as well resign ourselves to the amygdala-dominated or reptilian brain, reactive and instinctive rather than rational and reflective-mindful. The present or rather, the dominant  systems of thought encourage the former and does not offer a lasting solution to this mental crisis.

Because it knows no better?  No,  because human minds have already existed since its advent on this planet.  But, what it has not allowed itself to do is the development of a progressive evolution of its mental faculties, as dictated by so-called political expediency.  Decrees and edicts have stalled the flowering/blossoming of the human mind, and which, most  institutionalized religions holding sway have inflicted upon humanity with brute force/violence, subtler mental faculties be damned.

There is a yawning gap between the internal and external man.  The external man inflicts harm upon others but the former considers it wrong to do so.  He kills somebody with seeming impunity but will do everything in his power to save his “own”  life.  Already, this attitude is in complete dissonance with the known laws of the universe which states that if you kill somebody, accept that you be killed or harmed in return.

Be aware that if you entertain the thought that you have escaped the arms of the law, there is no escape from your mind.  Education must teach this most basic and fundamental moral truth in the strongest possible terms, or else, suffer the consequences of personality disorders.  Why do you think you have an increase in serial killers  in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world, foremost in so-called first world countries?  This crisis is spawned further by ignoring this most basic of truths.

Education must also teach how to deal with, and treat this mind.  Again, the predominant/existing  studies in psychology and psychiatry are focused on the symptoms rather than the cause, not because of not knowing any better but rather by refusing to know better, that is, in going beyond the confines of observable phenomena.   It is like having the tools of the trade but refusing to use them so as not to rock the boat, remaining guided/constricted by accepted/predictable paradigms.

So, the choice is: stagnate or advance towards an enlightened state?

Allow me to quote the Dalai Lama:

‘Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices his money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present – the result being that he does not live in the present or the future. He lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.’

 When conveyed so clearly and concisely, the insanity of how many of us live our lives is painfully apparent. But so too is the treatment:

 Prioritize emotional, physical, mental and spiritual health above other pursuits

  1. Since 99% of what we worry about doesn’t happen (and worrying doesn’t prevent the other 1% from occurring), stop worrying – it’s a waste of energy.
  2. Spend today enjoying today – not thinking about tomorrow
  3. Always remember that your days, breaths and heartbeats are numbered; do not squander them on what doesn’t matter.